Workshops

ALL WORKSHOPS SUITABLE FOR ALL LEVELS, LENGTH OF WORKSHOPS FLEXIBLE

EXCEPT BUT I DON’T EVEN KNOW IT IN ENGLISH! – HIGH LEVEL OF FLUENCY IN ASL IS NECESSARY

This is classifiers discussion and development- how to create new classifiers for new images -- The use and variety of classifiers go beyond the standard ones taught in ASL classes- true fluency in ASL includes the ability to create new classifiers that are syntactically correct, and the meaning of such new classifiers clearly conveyed. Attendees will learn models for classifier creation opportunities, and how to think in 3-D/Visual linguistic style, and a greater understanding of classifier use. Attendees will also learn how to describe actions and objects without using standard ASL vocabulary or reliance on PSE.

Promo for Crom Saunders’ Creating Classifiers Workshop
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How do you interpret a surgical procedure if you’re not an intern? How do you interpret classic literature if you weren’t an English major? How do you interpret computer lingo if you can’t even set the microwave clock? This workshop will help participants develop general tools for dealing with specialized vocabulary, and to broaden the use of their already developed skills to turn jargon into understandable and sign-able concepts.
ASL grammar includes a great deal more than just sign vocabulary and placement. This workshop focuses on the use of facial expressions/mouthing morphemes as a key linguistic tool in translating from English to ASL and vice versa, with plenty of examples and facial exercises.
Learn ASL idioms that are unique to ASL and Deaf Culture, how to identify and use ASL idioms within appropriate context, and understand given ASL idioms and to translate/interpret them appropriately. In other words, LEARN BLAP DOUBLE -BRAIN!
Signing for the theater is a different style and presentation than signing for the classroom or conversationally. This workshop is for those who would like to interpret for theatre, or to sign with “stage presence”. Participants will learn techniques and ways to hone skills to that will them be more expressive, and a more streamlined part of theatrical interpreting work. These techniques also help interpreters in other work environments in terms of clarity, role assignment, and reducing lag time.

When asked to interpret Shakespeare or Dr. Seuss, do you start looking for the nearest exit? Have no fear! This workshop will allow participants to look at bodies of text that are traditionally established in content, context, and tone, and the obstacles in translation that comes with these traditional views. This workshop will provide you with the tools to translate text into ASL without sacrificing content, and preserving the fun and linguistic integrity of these language masters- Dr. Seuss and William Shakespeare (and other writers with similar styles).

Shakespeare fills me with fear;
All these old words along with thees and thous
Metaphors galore with moons, wine and deer,
Kings and fairies alike making vows.

How can I translate all that?
And then there’s The Cat in the Hat!
Dr. Seuss makes up words left and right
Interpreting his text is such a fright!

Wait! What’s this? A new workshop?
Crom Saunders with his fingerocketry
Presenting on how to make these authors pop
In ASL??? Sign me up! Oh jublillantous me!

ASL is a visual language, and requires the capability to visualize discourse in a non-linear, 3-D space, involving shifts in time, perspective, and dialogue/narrative roles. Doing a narrative in ASL requires a working knowledge of ASL linguistic features. This workshop reviews and expands on features of ASL linguistics with cultural and storytelling potential. These are skills that can be applied equally to everyday ASL conversation or to interpreting situations in just about every context. This workshop will go beyond just vocabulary and classifiers/constructed action, into discourse features, non-manual markers, visual vernacular and encapsulation.
The use of words and phrases that are considered obscenities or foul language in spoken English discourse are not always used the same way or with the same subtext in ASL and Deaf culture environment (in fact is often used in non-offensive or derogatory manner) and often can present difficulties in voicing ASL discourse accurately or receptive comprehension in conversation. This workshop will clarify the actual contextual meanings of specific words and phrases as they are used in ASL discourse and the best way to voice or otherwise interpret these words/phrases.
How do you interpret a chemistry class? Describe osmosis? What’s the sign for photosynthesis? How can you visually describe schizophrenia? This workshop will help participants develop general tools for dealing with specialized vocabulary in several branches of scientific study, and to broaden the use of their already developed skills to turn jargon into understandable and sign-able concepts.
TV shows, movies, books, and comic books have become an undeniable mainstay of American popular culture, however ASL has yet to catch up with providing sign vocabulary for many iconic and new characters, worlds, and canons in our culture. This workshop explores ways to describe these “universes” and will also present the most recent research and development of sign names for discussion and practice among the participants. Participants will also be invited to brainstorm ways to describe characters, worlds, and canons.
This workshop offers an exhaustive list of world geography sign vocabulary, mixed in with stories and information on the presenter’s own language research and travels within in various global sign communities. A unique opportunity to learn new vocabulary, cultural information, and new linguistic findings, all at once!
When asked to interpret literature into ASL, do you despair of ever being able to accomplish this task? This workshop will allow participants to look at bodies of text that are traditionally established in content, context, and tone, and the obstacles in translation that comes with these traditional views. This workshop will provide you with the tools to translate text into ASL without sacrificing content, and preserving the artistic and linguistic integrity of classic and contemporary authors.
When asked to interpret spoken/written poetry into ASL, do you despair of ever being able to accomplish this task? This workshop will allow participants to look at bodies of text that are traditionally established in content, context, and tone, and the obstacles in translation that comes with these traditional views. This workshop will provide you with the tools to translate text into ASL without sacrificing content, and preserving the artistic and linguistic integrity of classic and contemporary poets.
This activity looks at the art and grammar of ASL transformation: The use and variety of handshapes for seguing from one concept to another. True fluency in ASL includes the ability to create and incorporate transformations that are syntactically correct, and express creativity in a visual language. Attendees will learn models for transformation creation opportunities and a greater understanding of transformations, through group discussion and development.